Weekends with The Confused Raptor

I go by the pseudonym Shani Milan.
And I still don't know how to wink, whistle, do the fish thing, twist my tongue, && snap with both hands. No pressure, after all I'm just one confused raptor.

Sometimes memory tricks you. Sometimes beauty is best when it’s distant. But even from here, thirty feet away, I know that the reality of her going to match my memory.
— Every Day, David Levithan (via bookswelovetoquote)
Kindness connect to who you are, while niceness connects to how you want to be seen.
— Every Day, David Levithan (via bookswelovetoquote)
You,” he whispered, “are my Solomon’s mine, my uncharted empire. You are the only home I need to know, the only journey I want to take, the only treasure I would die to claim. You are exotic and familiar, opiate and tonic, hard conscience and sweet temptation.
— Crystal Cove, Lisa Kleypas (via bookswelovetoquote)
Day 96: Afternoons at the pier to fetch mom and mao. View high resolution

Day 96: Afternoons at the pier to fetch mom and mao.

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go
Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology. 
Fact submitted by: foreverahijabi

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go

Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.


Fact submitted by:
foreverahijabi

(via psych-facts)

You won’t allow me to go to school.
I won’t become a doctor.
Remember this:
One day you will be sick.

Poem written by an 11 year old Afghan girl 

This poem was recorded in a NYT magazine article about female underground poetry groups in Afghanistan. An amazing article about the ways in which women are using a traditional two line poetry form to express their resistance to male oppression, their feelings about love (considered blasphemous).

Here’s the link

(via conansdoyles)

(Source: katyuno, via langleav)

libertariantimes:

Pro-Palestinian protesters face police during a demonstration against violence in the Gaza strip, which had been banned by police, in Paris, July 19, 2014. (Reuters / Philippe Wojazer)

This is what love does: makes you want to be rewrite the world. It makes you want to choose the characters, build the scenery, guide the plot. The person you love sits across from you, and you want to do everything in your power to make it possible, endlessly possible. And when it’s just the two of you, alone in a room, you can pretend that this is how it is, this is how it will be.
— Every Day, David Levithan (via bookswelovetoquote)
What if you could meet your soul mate?” the ghost asked. “You’d want to avoid that?”
“Hell, yes. The idea that there’s one soul out there, waiting to merge with mine like some data-sharing program, depresses the hell out of me.”
“It’s not like that. It’s not about losing yourself.”
“Then what is it?” Alex was only half listening, still occupied with the viselike tightness of his chest.
“It’s like your whole life you’ve been falling toward the earth, until the moment someone catches you. And you realize that somehow you’ve caught her at the same time. And together, instead of falling, you might be able to fly.” The ghost went to the discarded clipping and stared down at the photo, riveted. “She’s a beaut, isn’t she?
— Dream Lake, Lisa Kleypas (via bookswelovetoquote)

I have been to many religious services over the years. Each one I go to only reinforces my general impression that religions have much, much more in common than they like to admit. The beliefs are almost always the same; it’s just that the histories are different. Everybody wants to believe in a higher power. Everybody wants to belong to something bigger than themselves, and everybody wants company in doing that. They want there to be a force of good on earth, and they want an incentive to be part of that force. They want to be able to prove their belief and their belonging, through rituals and devotion. They want to touch the enormity.

It’s only in the finer points and it gets complicated and contentious, the inability to realize that no matter what our religion or gender or race or geographic background, we all have about 98% in common with each other. Yes, the differences between male and female are biological, but if you look at the biology as a matter of percentage, there aren’t a whole lot of things that are different. Race is different purely as a social construction, not as an inherent difference. And religion – whether you believe in God or Yahweh or Allah or something else, odds are that at heart you want the same things. For whatever reason, like the focus of the 2% that’s different, and most of the conflict in the world comes from that.

— Every Day, David Levithan (via bookswelovetoquote)
You had to accept that the loss would always stay with you, like a reminder note pinned to the inside of your jacket. But there were still opportunities for happiness. Even joy.
— Christmas Eve at Friday Harbor, Lisa Kleypas (via bookswelovetoquote)
thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

undeadseanbean:

nonhoration:

earthlydreams:

This is so cool! But what country are they from? “Africa” is really vague.

Their names are Duro-Aina Adebola, Akindele Abiola, Faleke Oluwatoyin, and Bello Eniola and they’re from Lagos, Nigeria. There’s a neat video about them here.

#when will people start giving names to young non-white scientists??#bc that shit is getting old

Also when will people realise that AFRICA IS NOT ONE BIG COUNTRY and that saying ‘African Scientists’ is like saying ‘European Scientist’ to describe someone from the dozens of countries in the EU
View high resolution

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

undeadseanbean:

nonhoration:

earthlydreams:

This is so cool! But what country are they from? “Africa” is really vague.

Their names are Duro-Aina Adebola, Akindele Abiola, Faleke Oluwatoyin, and Bello Eniola and they’re from Lagos, Nigeria. There’s a neat video about them here.

Also when will people realise that AFRICA IS NOT ONE BIG COUNTRY and that saying ‘African Scientists’ is like saying ‘European Scientist’ to describe someone from the dozens of countries in the EU

(Source: untouchmyhair, via pizza)

Poppy was every fine, good, unselfish impulse that he would never have. She was every caring thought, loving gesture, happy moment, that he would never know. She was every minute of peaceful sleep that would forever elude him. According to the law of universal balance, Poppy had been put into the world to compensate for Harry and his wickedness. Which was probably why, as the opposite of two magnetic forces, Harry was so damnably drawn to her.
— Tempt Me at Twilight, Lisa Kleypas (via bookswelovetoquote)
If there’s one thing I’ve learned it’s this: we all want everything to be okay. We don’t even wish so much for fantastic for marvelous or outstanding. We will happily settle for okay, because most of the time, okay is enough.
— Every Day, David Levithan (via bookswelovetoquote)
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